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Posts Tagged ‘Hawaii kona coffee’

Kona coffee is cultivated on the ridge of Mount Hualalai and Mauna Loa in the Kona Districts of the Big Island of Hawaii. This coffee has developed a reputation that has made it one of the most expensive and scented coffees in the world. Only coffee from the Kona Districts can be legally described as “Kona”. The Kona coffee enjoy the hawaiian weather: bright sunny mornings, humid tropical afternoons and mild nights that create favorable coffee growing conditions.

The coffee plant was first brought to Kona in the nineteenth century by Samuel Reverend Ruggles.It was grown on large plantations, but the crash in the world coffee market in 1899 caused plantation owners to have to lease out their land to their workers. Most of these workers were originally from Japan, brought in to tend and harvest sugar cane.

Kona coffee blooms in February and March. Small white flowers cover the tree and are known as Kona Snow.

In April, green berries begin to appear on the trees. By late August the red fruits start to ripen for picking. Each tree will be hand-picked several times between August and January, and provides around 20 pounds of cherry.
Within 24 hours of picking, the cherry is run through a pulper, the beans are separated from the pulp, and then placed in a fermentation tank overnight. The fermentation time is dependent on the temperature and therefore on the elevation; beetween 12 and  24 hours. The beans are rinsed and spread to dry on a “hoshidana” or drying rack. Traditional hoshidanas have a rolling roof to cover the beans in the event of rain. It takes 7-14 days to dry the beans to an optimal moisture level of between 10-13%. From here, the beans are stored as “pergamino” or parchment. The parchment is milled off the green bean prior to roasting.
It takes seven to nine pounds of cherry to make one pound of roasted coffee. Thus 100 pounds of cherry will yield about 12 pounds of roasted coffee.

Hawaii Kona coffee is not easy to find in Italy, in fact, you can buy it only a few ‘Sanctuaries of coffee’. Its organolectic profile, in which flavor and aroma are more obvious characteristics of its body, makes it not so much suitable for the Italian espresso. Due to its high cost does not make it certain ingredient commercially acceptable to roasting for the preparation of new blend.

But the taste of this coffee remains, for the amateur, an experience not to lose, just try to imagine where this coffee born!

The Hawaii Kona coffee is present as a single origin in the Chiaroscuro exclusive conical cans line; off course with the air thigt system the mantein the best aroma.

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